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66 Awesome Shelters You Can Make With A Tarp

Tarps are great for stowing away in a backpack because they are lightweight, water resistant and very versatile in how you use them. This makes the tarp an ideal material for constructing some pretty cool makeshift shelters when it comes to survival in the wild.

Presented below are several tarp shelter designs to help you get started:

• A-Frame Tarp Shelter
Easy and fast: This shelter is made by stringing paracord between two trees. Then, the tarp is draped over the cord and staked down. You need to stretch the paracord tightly enough that it won’t sag in the middle.

• Sunshade Tarp Shelter
To construct this shelter, tie the paracord to four anchoring points. This shelter is ideal temporary protection against the rain because the water will pool in the middle, however note that as rain continues, water will continue to collect, becoming heavier and requiring that you push it off to the side. You can make this shelter sturdier by adding support to the corners.

• Lean-To Tarp Shelter
To create this shelter, tie paracord to two anchor points. Secure the tarp to the ground on the windward side. This type of shelter is great for deflecting the wind or providing sunshade.

• Tube Tent Tarp Shelter
This shelter is similar to the A-Frame tarp shelter, but the opposite ends of the tarp are secured together to provide a floor. To make it, secure the paracord between two trees and drape over the tarp. This is a sturdy shelter that can prevent rain from seeping in.

• Square Arch Tarp Shelter
Attach two paracord lengths to anchor points that are three feet apart and three feet high. Drape the tarp over the two lengths of paracord. Secure the long ends of the tarp with stakes.

• Bivy Bag Cornet Shelter
Tie the rope around a tree at four to five feet. Hammer in a stake to the ground at the other end. Drape the tarp over the rope diagonally, stretch out the corners, and hammer stakes on each side.

• C-Fly Wedge Shelter
Lay the tarp on the ground and secure it at the long side edge with two to four pegs. Use loop cords for the bottom fold. You can also use an extra rope to pull the fold out. Make a ridge line between two trees and hold the remaining tarp over the ridge line. Tie down each edge of the handing roof-line to the ground to secure it.

Note that cheap tarps tend to deteriorate quickly under UV light exposure, not very eco-friendly! Keep them in the shade when not in use.

Ok here is the link to the rest of the 66 designs: 66 Shelters You Can Make With A Tarp

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66 Awesome Shelters You Can Make With A Tarp
Graphic – off-grid.info. Images:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2f_v7iYeHuE
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pyramid_tarp_(487501150).jpg

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pole_tarp_and_rope_shelter_4855.JPG
https://pixabay.com/en/tarp-tent-camping-camp-nature-1373044/
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pole_tarp_and_rope_shelter_4855.JPG

Companion Planting Guide – Pin, Share, Print Out

Companion Planting
graphic © off-grid.info. Images – PD

Plants need good companions to thrive, however, relationships between them are varied – similar to relationships between people. Certain plants support each other while others just don’t get along! So if you want a thriving garden, make sure the place plants near to their friends! This practice is called companion planting and this handy infographic will show you everything you need to know.

Please hit share, pin to Pinterest or bookmark this useful chart for future use.

DIY Shipping Container Tiny Home – Bye Bye, Mortgage Slavery

We found this inspiring video by Kristen Dirksen that will show you one woman’s journey toward truly off-grid living.

Originally from Argentina, Lulu is a single mom currently living in California who decided to go back to school. Instead of taking on a full time job in order to pay rent and utility bills, she realized that she and her young daughter did not need to live in a conventional (expensive) home. Despite her lack of previous building experience, it took Lulu only one month to convert a shipping container into the 8 by 20 sq. ft. structure that she and her daughter now call home. Watch the video for a tour around Lulu’s property, where she later built a second structure (using a flatbed trailer she found at the dump) which is now her bedroom.

In the video, Lulu also shows off the bathroom, complete with the claw foot tub that she describes as one “luxury” she could not give up in her transition to off-grid living. Other creative innovations add character and charm—such as the placement of windows, allowing for utilization of sun (and stargazing at night).

Lulu also shows off some impressive features of the main unit including a simple yet fully functional kitchen—complete with a propane-powered camping stove and on-demand water heater. She is planning to build a third unit that will resemble a Japanese tea house.

Using only recycled materials, Lulu spent approximately $4000 to convert a shipping container (which she acquired for free) into a perfectly livable home; one which, as she explains in the video, would be considered a very nice house in other parts of the world where the standard of living is not as high. $4000 covered the cost of insulation (recycled styrofoam and bubble wrap), drywall, windows, cabinets, doors, dressers, hardwood floors, bathtub and toilet, as well as sinks for the bathroom and kitchen—and the flatbed trailer for the second unit.

Now how is that compared to a $200,000 mortgage? Plus she gets to spend much more time with family than slaving away.

Throughout the video, Lulu reflects on the choice she made and why it works for her and her family. She believes that children do not have to have a pink room with pink toys in order to be happy kids. This is evident in the film as her daughter and friends frolic around the property, giggling and playing. As Lulu’s brother in Argentina describes it, her lifestyle is como la pobreza con mucho estilio…como pobre elegante (“like poverty with a lot of style…elegant poor”).

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DIY Shipping Container - Tiny Home
Photo – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DsVxgOjNLbA